Santa Maria church and cathedral and Roman remains, Idanha-a-Velha

Over the years, I’ve written about some of my favourite traditional villages in Portugal, most of which are actually part of a network called Aldeias Históricas de Portugal. Under this official umbrella, there are 12 villages, all within the Centro region of Portugal. Most of them used to be borderRead More →

Steps to Santa Catarina fortress, Figueira da Foz, Portugal

Figueira da Foz, aka the Queen of Beaches, has been a popular Portuguese holiday resort for over 100 years, hence the number of hotels, holiday apartments and rooms to let. There is, of course, more to see and do in Figueira da Foz than lounge on its beaches or stroll the extensiveRead More →

Looking down the well, Quinta da Regaleira, Sintra

It may be less than an hour away from Lisbon but when you visit the enchantingly historical town of Sintra, you’ll see that it’s a world apart. Nestled in woodland filled with fanciful palaces, romantic gardens, centuries-old castles and convents, both Portuguese and British elites flocked to Sintra in the 18th andRead More →

Marvão village and Serra de São Mamede seen from the castle walls

When I first visited Marvão, in the Alto Alentejo region of Portugal, I was on foot and weary after a couple of botched attempts to follow a walking trail uphill to the village. After eventually finding the correct cobbled path through the cork oaks, I emerged in a fairy taleRead More →

Azenhas do Mar village, cliff and beach

Picture a collection of whitewashed cottages perched on a cliff overlooking a sandy beach and rocky coastline and you’ve got the village of Azenhas do Mar. In fact, you may already have seen images of this charming village within the Sintra-Cascais Natural Park – it’s very photogenic. Mike and I wentRead More →

Overlapping animals, rock art at Pensacoso, Foz Côa Portugal

Carved into the rugged rocks of the Côa Valley near the town of Vila Nova de Foz Côa you’ll find the very origins of animated art. The two-headed animals scratched into these ancient stones weren’t monsters roaming the Portuguese countryside. The extra heads represent movement, pretty clever for rock artRead More →